5 Celebrities Who Are Brujas, Witches or Embracing Yoruba

5 Celebrities Who Are Brujas, Witches or Embracing Yoruba

5 Celebrities Who Are Brujas, Witches or Embracing Yoruba

Recently, I connected with a distant side of my mother’s mother’s family I didn’t know much about. And through talking to them, listening to them talk about our history I learned that our family had a history of practicing a form of Voodoo, which comes from Vodun, an African religion brought to the Americas during the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Then I learned my grandfather’s grandmother was from Haiti and was a practitioner of Haitian Voodoo. I had always been fascinated with learning more about the African diaspora, primarily because so much of the history of Africans in America is overlooked or whitewashed. So, I dove right on into researching how Voodoo came to Haiti and to the Southern United States. I recalled reading a book from my childhood about a Marie Laveau, but I couldn’t remember who she was until I watched an episode of The Originals. Madam Laveau was a powerful Voodoo priestess who was referred to as the Queen of Voodoo. As I began to delve more into learning about these religions and where they came from I wondered if there were any celebrities who practiced voodoo. I learned that I am not alone in seeking out the spirituality of my ancestors. Black celebrities are embracing the spirituality of their ancestors. Here are 5 celebrities who are either practicing witches or brujas or actively incorporating African spirituality into their art.

Azealia Banks

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Source: Azealia Banks via Instagram

Azealia Banks is no stranger to controversy, especially when it comes to social media. But In 2016, the controversial rapper and singer was open about practicing Santeria. She even went as far as to post a video of the room where she practiced brujeria in the form of animal rituals. Perhaps she, like many other African American women, embracing the Diaspora religion of Santeria,  she’s reconnecting to the ancestors.

Rachel True

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Source: Huffington Post

Before she was one of the angsty, witchy outcasts in the teen thriller The Craft, Rachel True had already discovered her love for magic, tarot, and healing energy. Reading cards is actually helped Rachel land the iconic, Rochelle, on The Craft. Today Rachel reads cards at House of Intuition on Melrose Ave in Los Angeles.

Beyoncé

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Source: Twitter

Beyoncé has always subtly included pieces of African culture in her imagery. But her 2016 album, Lemonade, was an ode to diaspora spirituality as she channeled Oshun, one of the most revered Orishas in the Yoruba religion. Oshun is the fresh water and river goddess of beauty, love, fertility and healing.

Solange

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Source: Twitter

Solange, Beyonce’s equally talented and overtly woke sister channeled Yemaya, another river goddess who is the protector of women.

Erykah Badu

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Source: InStyle

Erykah Badu’s music is fused with lyrics about astral projection, mysticism, magic and spirituality. In a January 2017 interview with Vulture Magazine, she admitted to being into Candomblé and Santeria, two diaspora religions that fuse Yoruba traditions with Christianity and Indigenous practices.

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